Community

Take advantage of the many opportunities to get involved with the UNC Nutrition Research Institute (NRI) and help us become the world’s premier institute for scientific discovery: make a gift, attend an Appetite for Life event, or participate in our research.

Employment

As scientists, physicians, and healthcare practitioners better understand nutritional individuality, they will be able to enhance human health, improve brain development, and more effectively treat diseases like obesity, cancer, and diabetes. Be part of our team!


Most of the Nutrition Research Institute’s faculty is appointed to UNC’s Department of Nutrition at the Gillings School of Global Public Health. It is the only nutrition department in the US situated in both a school of public health and a school of medicine. A global leader in research and training, the department engages in innovative work that capitalizes on both these schools’ approaches to health, resulting in an unusual breadth of scientific and policy approaches. Visit the UNC Department of Nutrition here.

NCRC-logo3

The North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis, NC, is a 350-acre research center located just north of Charlotte, NC. The campus is a scientific community that collaboratively works to empower human health through nutrition. Eight universities, the David H. Murdock Research Institute, companies and entrepreneurs focus research and development on safer, more nutritious crops, healthier foods and precision nutrition. Research and product development are collaborative and multi-disciplinary. Focus areas are as varied as phytochemicals in fruits, vegetables, grains and herbs; exercise physiology; post-harvest physiology; population-based, genetic studies; and precision nutrition. Learn more about the North Carolina Research Campus here.

 

emailcicle fbcircle twittercircle

NRI Updates

 

What should I eat on my night shift?

June 11, 2019 – Martin Kohlmeier, MD, PhD, director of the Human Research Core at the UNC Nutrition Research Institute in Kannapolis, NC, says, “The effect of a disrupted sleep cycle on energy metabolism is real but of modest size. In the end, it’s about the practicalities of food access, convenience, and the time demands of the shift. Planning ahead is your friend. Read more.

Chinese herb, Lycii Cortex, may be a natural method of treating diabetes

May 31, 2019 – The traditional Chinese herb Lycii Cortex (LyC), with its powerful compound kukoamine B, could be an effective nutraceutical choice for lowering blood glucose when used alone or in combination with low doses of first-line diabetes medications. YuanYuan Li, a postdoctoral researcher in the UNC Nutrition Research Institute, is lead author of the paper, “A Metabolomics Approach to Investigate Kukoamine B—A Potent Natural Product With Anti-diabetic Properties” published online January 22 in Frontiers in PharmacologyRead more.

The DNA diet: How knowing your genes can help you fit into your jeans

May 28, 2019 (CNN) Most people have this basic understanding of genetics: You inherit genes from your parents, and their DNA combines to create your unique genetic makeup. This can include more obvious traits such as eye color and height but also more complex traits that may involve multiple genes, such as risk of diseases including diabetes, heart disease, obesity and cancer, as well as all aspects of metabolism.

What many people may not realize is that there is a significant interaction between your environment and your genes, and your diet is one of the most basic and potentially modifiable components of your environment.

Read the full article here.

Studies Explore Mechanisms Behind Obesity-Cancer Link

May 20, 2019 –New studies led by University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers explore biological mechanisms behind obesity and its link with cancer. Research findings presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2019 explore possible reasons for obesity-related resistance to breast cancer treatment and possible strategies to overcome obesity-related immune suppression in cancer. Read more.