July 27, 2017 – Carol L. Cheatham, PhD, has been selected to join the Education Board at the American Health Council. The council, comprising leaders and contributors from all areas of healthcare, is America’s leading organization in health awareness and advancement. Dr. Cheatham will share her knowledge and expertise on the effects of nutrition on brain development and function.

With more than 17 years of experience in the fields of psychology and neuroscience, Dr. Cheatham offers valuable insight to the council through her position as an associate professor at UNC–Chapel Hill and the research she conducts in the Cheatham Nutrition & Cognition Lab at the Nutrition Research Institute. Her lab explores the brain across the lifespan.

Among her many accomplishments, Dr. Cheatham is proud to have published seven book chapters and twenty-seven peer reviewed publications. She has spoken by invitation at 60 conferences and meetings in 17 countries and has received funding from the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Agriculture, industry, and the Gates Foundation. She maintains affiliations with the American Association for the Advancement of Science; Society for Research in Child Development; American Society of Nutrition; and International Society for Nutrigenetics & Nutrigenomics, among others.

Her commitment to research has led to numerous recognitions, including: 2014 National Trio Achiever’s Award; International Life Sciences Institute 2011 Future Leader Nomination; 2010 Distinguished Alumna, Northwest College; Danone Nutrition Leadership Institute Inductee (2009); and New Investigator Award – International Society for the Study of Fatty Acids and Lipids (2008).

Continued research in the Cheatham Nutrition and Cognition Lab is focusing on designing and implementing new research on the gut-brain axis and on nutritional interventions to optimize brain function in girls with Rett Syndrome diagnoses, those with traumatic brain injury, and typically developing children based on their background genomic influences.